Book Review, Zetetic Astronomy

Updated: Sep 1


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Zetetic Astrology written by Samuel Birley Rowbotham (AKA Parallax), who in life was an English inventor, writer, philosopher, and mathematician, is a scientific inquiry into the true nature of the earth and by extension the universe. He details his experiential process within 314 pages, spanning a wide variety of topics to include experiments that demonstrate the true form of standing water thus proving the earth to be a plane, to investigating the cause of tides.


Parallax spends the first section of the book covering his 15 experiments he conducted to prove the earth to be a plane. His attention to detail is exquisite and meticulous, the entirety of the procedure and the conclusion are easy to follow and logical flow. Aided by figures, the reader is given a visual image to help understand what is taking place and how the mathematics applies in the real world. Unlike many scientists of today, Parallax does not substitute complex mathematical formulas for empirical evidence. What can be seen with the eyes and the senses is greatly taken into account with supporting math that is not too overly complicated. This allows the reader to be able to follow along and not get lost in jargon or abstract concepts.

A true philosopher in every sense of the word, he defines his terms before he uses them and applies a strictly logical approach to his work. In chapter 1 Parallax, and throughout the book, explains his disgust over the scientific community’s fascination of theories over repeatable observable experimentation.

“None can doubt that by making special experiments, and collecting manifest and undeniable facts, arranging them in logical order, and observing what is natural and fairly deducible therefrom, the result must be more consistent and satisfactory than the contrary method of framing a theory…of which there is no direct and practical evidence…for the purpose of giving an apparent and plausible, but not necessarily truthful explanation of phenomena.” (Parallax, pg. 11)

Having read the entirety of the book, I must admit that Parallax’s style of writing is satisfying to read as it is informative. He spared no expense in his search of the truth and it shows not only in his experiments buts also in his examinations for the so-called “proofs” of earth’s rotundity (second half of the book). Both a gentleman and a scholar, he did not rely on the tactics of name-calling or belittling an idea, as the intelligentsia of today is so quick to do. Instead, he approached each objection with a high level of reasoning and rationale to rival the great philosophers of old. Parallax dedicated his life to this research and while he was alive, he eagerly debated and presented his ideas. Here is a sample list of organizations that praised him for his research (the end of the book contains what exactly they had to say), Wilts Independent, Liverpool Mercury, Athlone Sentinel, Westmeath Independent, Preston Guardian, Leicester Chronicle, Norfolk Herald, Yarmouth Free Press, Cambridge Chronicle, Croydon Chronicle, Leicestershire Mercury, and South Mid-land Free Press.


Unfortunately, you may have never heard of Parallax or his work, and this I believe is by design. The academics and the ruling elites are always seeking to cover up or hide away people or work that goes against the narrative. You know this to be true and have probably witnessed this for yourself, especially in recent years. If you are genuinely interested in what Parallax wrote and want to dip into one of the most fascinating minds of the 19th century, then consider picking up a copy. I thoroughly enjoyed it and highly recommend it!


Remember to test all things and may the Ruach guide you in your studies.




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